Tesla Picks Nevada for its Massive Gigafactory
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Tesla Factory, Fremont (CA, USA)

Tesla Factory, Fremont (CA, USA)

Tesla Motors Inc. is planning to pick a site in Nevada for it’s proposed up to $5 billion battery manufacturing plant and could release an official statement on the matter on Thursday, as indicated by an individual acquainted with the electric car makers plans.

State authorities have scheduled a press conference at 4 p.m. Pacific time on Thursday in Carson City for a "major economic development announcement”.

Nevada offered Tesla one of the biggest incentives ever in the history of the U.S. auto industry. A representative for Nevada's state economic development office declined to remark on Tesla's choice. Gov. Brian Sandoval dropped a little hint on Twitter: "Stay tuned for a real advertisement tomorrow at 4pm identified with monetary improvement in #NV."

Tesla will build $5 billion battery plant in Reno

By picking Nevada, Tesla would get a gigafactory manufacturing site near its Fremont, Calif., assembly plant and close to hand access to lithium, an essential raw material for the batteries. The factory is also nearby its corporate headquarters in Palo Alto. Tesla and electronics giant Panasonic have plans to spend $4 billion to $5 billion on the project, employ up to 6,500 workers and to create 35 gigawatt hours of battery cells every year in the gigafactory at full production. The plant in the long run is expected to create more than the current lithium-ion battery production on the planet today.

Battery industry researchers and officials have been incredulous of Tesla's arrangement for the production line. On Wednesday, Lux Research issued a report evaluating that the gigafactory would have 57% overcapacity in 2020 as sales of Tesla vehicles will be short of what 50% of what the organization is predicting.

"I think the single most important factor is the site's low-cost green power," said John Boyd, principal of The Boyd Company, a site selection firm that had predicted Nevada as the possible victor. Reno offers Tesla decisions among solar, wind and geothermal energy for the plant. He likewise said Nevada's absence of corporate and personal income taxes helped its selection.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has said previously that the winning state’s bid would be expected to provide tax incentives with value of around $400 million, something that would require legislative action in Nevada. Gov. Brian Sandoval has "conferred with legislative leaders", as reported by the Reno Gazette-Journal, to call a meeting early next week to think over an incentive package for Tesla. The special session will likely last one or two days.

Tesla needs to begin development soon to finish the plant by 2017, when it plans to reveal its third vehicle, an electric car called the Model III with a 200-mile range that it intends to sell starting at $35,000.

Tesla recently started creating a site close Reno, Nev., however the organization had said it was conceivable that a few others states could in any case vie for the undertaking. Officials in California had hurried to assemble an incentive deal before the end of its 2014 administrative session, yet couldn't get a promise from Tesla before the end of its session a month ago.

Texas likewise gave a little extra effort to land the plant. Texas Gov. Rick Perry made no less than one visit to California to court Tesla. At last, the closeness of Nevada, notwithstanding the site work effectively finished were variables that tipped the scales' to choose Nevada.

Musk plans to decrease battery costs by 30% through the scale of the plant and by getting production partners who would be able to provide the base anode, cathode and electrolyte material handling into the manufacturing facility. The plant is said to be up to 10 million square feet in size, the organization revealed and is said to be bigger than any single industrial facility in the U.S.

In the beginning of 2014, Tesla had been scouting locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas, and had set off a rivalry between the states to think of incentives bundles that could add up to 10% of the venture cost, i.e. about $500 million.

Author
Carrie Ann is Editor-in-Chief at Industry Leaders Magazine, based in Las Vegas. Carrie covers technology, trends, marketing, brands, productivity, and leadership. When she isn’t writing she prefers reading. She loves reading books and articles on business, economics, corporate law, luxury products, artificial intelligence, and latest technology. She’s keen on political discussions and shares an undying passion for gadgets. Follow Carrie Ann on Twitter, Facebook & Google.

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