McDonald’s Beef Antibiotic Policy Could Signal Shift for Fast Food Industry

Ranchers and farmers have been pumping cows, chicken, and pigs full of human antibiotics that is slowly destroying the world’s ability to treat infections. The U.N. has called it a global health crisis on par with AIDS, and the CDC now blames antibiotic-resistance for causing 23,000 American deaths each year. While most countries have taken steps to limit the use of antibiotics in animals, there are loopholes in the legislation that may still allow antibiotics to be used as growth promoters.

Chipotle, Subway and Panera Bread are among the nation’s fast food restaurant chains that serve meat “raised without antibiotics,” while McDonald’s has claimed that its chicken is raised without crucial antibiotics.

McDonalds-beef-antibiotic-policy

Companies are well aware that consumers are driving the demand for antibiotic-free meat.

McDonald’s, the nation’s top beef buyer, has announced a new beef antibiotic policy affecting 85 percent of its global beef supply by 2021. The new policy directs its global suppliers to reduce the use of the drugs in beef produced for the company. The Natural Resources Defense Council has been a stakeholder engaged on the policy since early 2018.

The Chicago-based company said it would work with meat suppliers in its 10 largest beef-sourcing markets, including the U.S.

A New Label for Bigger Profits

Companies are well aware that consumers are driving the demand for antibiotic-free meat. More than half of the U.S. chicken industry is now under a commitment to spearhead a number of changes, including antibiotic-free meat and poultry.

McDonalds-antibiotic-beef-policy

McDonald’s new beef antibiotic policy could set profits soaring. According to a Consumer Reports survey of over 1,000 people, roughly 43% said they always or often buy meat raised without antibiotics at the supermarket. Nearly 6 in 10 people are more inclined to eat at a restaurant if the meat and poultry were raised without antibiotics, and would pay more for a “no antibiotics” burger.

The new antibiotic policy could signal a shift for the global fast food industry.

No Antibiotics Doesn’t Safeguard Against Crisis

No antibiotic policies would still allow fast-food restaurants and livestock producers use of antibiotics that aren’t medically important, which can lead to microbial resistance. Tara C. Smith, Ph.D., associate professor of public health at Kent State University, says genes that create resistance to medically important antibiotics can still tag along with less crucial drugs, leading to similar consequences.

Avatar
Anna Domanska
Anna Domanska is an Industry Leaders Magazine author possessing wide-range of knowledge for Business News. She is an avid reader and writer of Business and CEO Magazines and a rigorous follower of Business Leaders.

Recent Posts

Elior acquires Nestor, the single meal food delivery startup

Elior acquires Nestor, the single meal food delivery startup

Elior, the corporate catering company, has acquired the French startup Nestor for an undisclosed amount. Nestor, a Paris, France-based food delivery service, started in 2015 with a
2 days ago
Axa gears to buy office space worth €800m in European cities

Axa gears to buy office space worth €800m in European cities

Axa Investment Managers, the French fund house, is not too worried about predictions that the post-pandemic world will see more people working from home and office real estates shr
3 days ago
ShareChat raises $502 million at $2 billion valuation

ShareChat raises $502 million at $2 billion valuation

ShareChat, the Indian owner of short video app Moj, has raised $502 million in the series E round of funding, pushing its value at $2.1 billion in the market. The five-year-old com
3 days ago
Small business groups form coalition to lobby for strong antitrust laws

Small business groups form coalition to lobby for strong antitrust laws

Small merchant groups are coming together to rally for strong antitrust laws to prevent big conglomerates like Amazon from swallowing up the smaller traders and businesses. Trade g
3 days ago
Vitol’s profit soars during 2020 oil crisis

Vitol’s profit soars during 2020 oil crisis

The world’s largest independent oil trader Vitol made record profits in 2020 as the fluctuations in the global energy markets resulted in a windfall. Vitol suffered an $85 billio
4 days ago
Seadrill proposes debt write off of $4.8 billion

Seadrill proposes debt write off of $4.8 billion

Seadrill Ltd., a deepwater drilling contracting company, owned by billionaire John Fredriksen, said it is ready to write off a debt of over $4.8 billion, giving lenders a 99 perce
5 days ago