Labor Department Reports Strong Employment Growth Rates In May
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Labor Department

Labor Department Reports Strong Employment Growth Rates In May

In May, the labor market continued its resurgence, as reported by the U.S government on Friday, with the U.S economy adding up to 280,000 new job positions, which is more than the 220,000 jobs that economists have anticipated. Whereas, the unemployment rate hit about 5.5 per cent, but that increment was mainly due to number of people seeking for jobs, and entering into the labor force for the first time.

The data revealed from the Labor department stated that the U.S. employments recovery is continuing at a descent clip - a sign that the economy has underlying strength in spite of other recent data showing the recovery in a slump. In March, the estimated employment growth was revised up from 85,000 to 119,000, while in April, the numbers declined from 223,000 to 221,000 jobs added.

Labor Secretary Tom Perez said in an interview that people are confident that they can get a job. These all factors point towards the U.S economy with the wind at its back.

The sectors with the highest employment gains were professional and business services, including 63,000 net new occupations, and hospitality and leisure that included 57,000 employments. The health awareness industry generated up to 47,000 job vacancy. Likewise, workers enjoyed strong compensation picks up in May, and their average hourly income climbed 8 pennies to $24.96. However, the rate of growth compared to a year prior still floats around 2 percent.

The U.S. government data revealed that the job market has turned to one of the brightest spots in the nation's economic recovery, after investing on life support. Jobs are being generated at the fastest pace since the dot-com boom of the late 1990s. The number of individuals out of work for at least six months has dropped over the past year, and there are signs that so-called underemployment - people taking jobs that don't utilize their skills – is finally tapering off.

Earlier this week, Payroll processor ADP anticipated that the economy included up to 201,000 occupations in May, breaking a five-month streak of declining growth. In the mean time, on Thursday, a different report was revealed by the government that the number of people filing for unemployment insurance, interestingly dropped a week ago by 8,000 to 276,000 - the fewest number since the early 2000s.

On Friday, Analysts indicated solid private readings of the labor market and falling unemployment claims to boost their desires for a strong employments report.

Robust hiring is helping to drive a recovery in the ambushed real estate market, especially in the West regions. The National Association of Realtors index of pending home deals for that region hopped 16 per cent in April, as compared to a year ago. That helped push the national numbers to their highest level, following the super hot market of 2006.

On Thursday, NAR boss financial analyst, Lawrence Yun wrote in a blog entry that more people working means more salary and more potential mortgage holders. More employments also involve more office leasing and increasing rental housing demands. Yet, rapid employment growth rate has not translated into a stronger monetary expansion.

Revised government data released last week revealed that the U.S. economy shrank during the winters. Consumers curtailed their spending, a stronger dollar weighed on exports and awful climate and a strike at ports in the West Coast took the wind out of the recovery’s momentum, and estimates of growth for the second quarter have been weak.

Federal Reserve Gov. Lael Brainard said in a speech that it would not be the first run through this recovery has continued in fits and starts. The underlying energy of the recovery has proven generally defenseless to progressive headwinds that have kept overall economic growth well beneath the average pace of previous upturns, which is confusing the Federal’s endeavors to withdraw its backing for the economy.

The central bank has kept its key interest rate at zero for over six years with an end goal to boost spending, lending, and investment. But, in the midst of an enhanced outlook for the economy, Federal Chair Janet Yellen has said that she has expected to start raising interest rate this year - a move that impacts the cost of a mortgage and other consumer credit. A few Fedearal authorities, alongside the International Monetary Fund (IMF), are urging the central bank to hold up until one year from now to hike interest rates.

Author
Carrie Ann is Editor-in-Chief at Industry Leaders Magazine, based in Las Vegas. Carrie covers technology, trends, marketing, brands, productivity, and leadership. When she isn’t writing she prefers reading. She loves reading books and articles on business, economics, corporate law, luxury products, artificial intelligence, and latest technology. She’s keen on political discussions and shares an undying passion for gadgets. Follow Carrie Ann on Twitter, Facebook & Google.

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