Intel MXC Cables to Offer Data Transfer at 800Gbps to Cloud Data Centers
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Intel and its partners have announced that they will soon commence the commercial production of its 800 gigabit per second optical network cables based on the optical interconnect innovation, MXC, developed at its Silicon Photonics lab.

The new cable is based on the innovation by Intel’s Silicon Photonics Lab. Companies like Google use fiber optics to transfer data over long distances, however, its data centers information moves through traditional copper cables.

The new cable is based on the innovation by Intel’s Silicon Photonics Lab. Companies like Google use fiber optics to transfer data over long distances, however, its data centers information moves through traditional copper cables.

How it works?

It further disclosed that a number of components and cable makers including U.S.Conec, Corning, Tyc Electronics, and Molex have lined up to offer MXC parts and cabling. MXC utilizes Intel’s Silicon Photonics Innovation, which makes use of optical systems administration and silicon parts to shuttle data between systems in a data center. The MXC standard works with an exceptionally designed lensed connector to minimize connection issues, and can support up to 64 fibers per cable.

The links can transmit a maximum of 800 gbps each way with a total of 1.6 tbps in both ways, and are slender than their copper counterparts running up to 300 meters without signal degradation and can carry conventional Ethernet and additional PCI-Express 3.0 signs.

One of its last features indicates that MXC will be utilized as to disaggregate server components, in order to make them servers into collections of optically interfaced links that can be swapped out independent of each other.

..Hindrances to be addressed before it hits the market

Currently issues are being addressed that stand in the way of broader adoption of MXC. No statement about the execution of MXC in data centre has been given, in spite of the fact that initial application for MXC will be a must as a part of replacement for rack-level interconnects.

A lot depends on the reception of the MXC, and if its worth it.

Fujitsu has its own high-speed optical cable connector in the making, and regardless of the fact that it doesn’t support the bandwidth of MXC, a widespread adoption of either one of the product which gets into the market first is most likely. Earlier Intel had released information about bringing the same optical innovation on the motherboard level, and given that a MXC’s cable can have as much as three times the transfer speed of PCle 4.0 bus(31gbps), it doesn’t look like an foolish idea.

Most customers demand for high-bandwidth peripherals and it seems that it has been fulfilled by USB 3.0 (5gbps) and its project successor, USB 3.1 (10gbps). Intel has driven plans for the underlying Silicon Photonics Innovation, and is more interested in endorsing as a way to overcome bandwidth and signaling limitations within a framework outline and not as a machine-to-machine or machine-to storage interconnect. The MXC has been positioned as a successor to technologies.

Author
Richard Meryn, Associate Editor Industry Leaders Magazine (www.industryleadersmagazine.com)

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