Federal Bill Proposes Kill Switch Technology To Be Made Mandatory On All Smartphones

In a bid to curb the rampant increase of smartphone theft in the U.S. several senators want to impose a kill switch on all smartphones on the federal level. The proposed law called the Smartphone Theft Prevention Act might make it mandatory for every smartphone to have a remotely activated kill switch. This law will be pertinent to all smartphones sold in the US and might as well become a worldwide practice soon.

Four Democratic U.S. senators Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, Barbara Mikulski of Maryland and Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, are leading the charge for the new bill. The senators believe that cellphone theft puts users in danger and costs consumers more $30 billion every year. They are convinced that the legislation would decrease mobile theft and help consumers protect their data if their smartphones are stolen.

 

Almost 50 percent of all robberies involve a smartphone in New York City and San Francisco, while in Oakland, that number goes even higher.

Almost 50 percent of all robberies involve a smartphone in New York City and San Francisco, while in Oakland, that number goes even higher.

The kill switch technology allows consumers to render the mobile device unusable and will essentially prevent them from being reactivated in the event of a theft. The functionality also allows owners to remotely wipe their personal data from their devices. Under the proposed bill, mobile carriers would have to include the technology free of charge. Mobile device theft has gone up rapidly in recent years. Almost 50 percent of all robberies involve a smartphone in New York City and San Francisco, while in Oakland, that number goes even higher.

Klobuchar, one of the founders of the bill says the kill switch functionality proposed in the new federal law will help the owners of mobile devices to keep their information private, and also safeguard their identity and finances thereby rendering it difficult for criminals to use a stolen smartphone.

However, some of the eminent technology companies oppose the proposed bill because they consider it as yet another government reservation on the tech industry’s potency to innovate. The cellular industry trade group CTIA is a vociferous opponent of the legislation as are most cellphone carriers. Another main concern among tech enthusiasts is that a kill switch could be activated by accident, rendering a noble person’s phone inoperable for no apparent reason. Currently there is also a lot of misgiving between the tech industry and government. Yet, most authorities impel that the kill switch technology is meant to safeguard users and not control them.

It is still not certain whether the bill will pass, but the demand for a kill switch from law enforcement officials is growing with each and every smartphone theft.

Richard Meryn
Richard Meryn, Associate Editor Industry Leaders Magazine (www.industryleadersmagazine.com)

Recent Posts

Tesla Cybertruck V/s Rivian’s R1T

Tesla Cybertruck V/s Rivian’s R1T

The Tesla Cyberturck left many disappointed with its alien space ship-like design; though both trucks are still under production, what matters most is what comes under the hood.
17 hours ago
College sports is multibillion dollar industry in the US

College sports is multibillion dollar industry in the US

According to data analyzed by GOBankingRates, head football coaches, closely followed by basketball coaches, easily rack up seven-figure salaries in the US.
2 days ago
Top women influencers in finance and wealth management

Top women influencers in finance and wealth management

It is only in the last century or so that women have been publicly acknowledged for their roles as leaders in various fields. Here’s a list of women influencers by Industry Leade
3 days ago
Brian Goldner, who led Hasbro’s transformation into an entertainment giant, passes away at 58

Brian Goldner, who led Hasbro’s transformation into an entertainment giant, passes away at 58

Brian Goldner, the CEO and Chairman of toymaker Hasbro, has died at age 58, the company said Tuesday (Oct. 12).
5 days ago
JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon slams Bitcoin as worthless

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon slams Bitcoin as worthless

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon took another potshot at Bitcoin on Monday by calling the cryptocurrency “worthless” likening trading BTC to smoking cigarettes.
5 days ago
Refiner Eneos to buy Japan Renewable Energy for $1.8 billion

Refiner Eneos to buy Japan Renewable Energy for $1.8 billion

Eneos Holdings, Inc., Japan’s biggest refiner, announced Monday it would buy Japan Renewable Energy (JRE) for $1.8 billion to expand its low-carbon businesses.
6 days ago