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Advice for Gwyneth Paltrow If She Wants To Be Taken Seriously As An Entrepreneur

Gwyneth Paltrow’s multimillion dollar retail empire Goop recommends its readers try “Body Vibes stickers,” which costs about $60 for a pack of 10, to promote healing by tackling imbalances. Thankfully, NASA called out GOOP on time before more serious damage could be done. And, things did not go well. Oh, Paltrow.
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Looks like Gwyneth Paltrow is in hot waters again. Thankfully, this time she’s in hot waters without a Jade egg stuffed where it shouldn’t be. Recently, Paltrow’s multimillion dollar retail empire Goop was called out by NASA for selling stickers that “re-balance energy.” Things did not go well.

Goop recommends its readers try “Body Vibes stickers,” which costs about $60 for a pack of 10, to promote healing by tackling imbalances. In a post on Thursday, the luxury retailers said that the stickers, which are sold by a group called Body Vibes, are "made with the same conductive carbon material NASA uses to line space suits so they can monitor an astronaut's vitals during wear."

This is not true, in case you’re wondering.

Goop’s Latest Health Scam

Following an investigation by Gizmodo, the claim was removed from the website. A representative from NASA’s spacewalk office told Gizmodo that “do not have any conductive carbon material lining the spacesuits.”

Mark Shelhamer, former chief scientist at NASA’s human research division, told Gizmodo that he was unimpressed by Body Vibes’ claims, describing it as “a load of BS”.

Meanwhile, Goop released a statement saying they have “gone back to the company to inquire about the claim and removed the claim from our site until we get additional verification.”

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Goop has released a statement saying they have “gone back to the company to inquire about the claim and removed the claim from our site until we get additional verification.”

Goop’s little adventure with NASA made us scroll through some of its past exploits. We must say we’re impressed. We’re impressed by the level of imprudence a luxury lifestyle brand (which, by the way, has more than doubled in 2015 and 2016) can feign. Don’t believe us? Look for yourself.

Oscar-winning actress Gwyneth Paltrow began offering homespun weekly newsletters offering life advice. Nine years later and Goop is now a lifestyle brand, advising women on how to improve their sex lives, touting complex diet plans, and suggesting unorthodox cleanses and steams. Last year, Goop surpassed one million subscribers and is growing.

During its course of last few years, the luxury lifestyle brand has caused quite a stir for offering “open-minded alternatives” AKA pseudoscience mentalities such as global warming hoax, homeopathy medicine and anti-vaccine.

In 2016, Paltrow announced she will discontinue her involvement with Goop, addressing criticism involving vaginal steaming. In a surprising turn of events, she was named CEO in June 2017.

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Controversial Science

One of Paltrow’s most ambitious product yet is Goop Wellness. It’s a collection of vitamin supplements created in collaboration with Paltrow-approved doctors. Balls In The Air pill is antioxidant rich that targets thyroid dysfunction, autoimmunity, or digestive issues. High School Genes is made for women in peri-postmenopausal state whose metabolism requires a boost. The Mother Load pill is to help new moms get back on their feet.

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Anyone can have access to the pills on GOOP without having to refer to a scientifically validated medical diagnosis.

Of course, like everything else on Goop, the medicine line includes the mother hen’s personal touches. For instance, Why Am I So Effing Tired pill was created because Paltrow herself felt tired and sleepy all the time.

Anyone can have access to the pills without having to refer to a scientifically validated medical diagnosis. The vitamin pills will affect, and the medical problem you have will back-pedal. It’s wise to meet your doctor for a more in-depth conversation and analysis. But Goop won’t tell you this.

Goop also would not mention the name of the manufacturer it’s collaborating with. While at the same time, it does not fail to mention how the pills are gluten- and GMO-free, and manufactured in a triple GMP facility.

Furthermore, if you carefully read the fine print it says that none of the statements on its label have been FDA-approved. Isn’t this widely irresponsible to lure women with lucrative marketing design, when you haven’t received FDA clearance?

Irresponsible Claims

In 2014, the meticulous lifestyle expert preached the importance of getting V-Steams, a spa treatment that cleanses a lady’s lady bits. The vaginal steaming acts as an energetic release, and helps balance female hormone levels. The procedure also involves placing flower buds and boiled leaves on a specific part of the body to detoxify. No surprises there, gynecologists were less convinced by the unusual suggestions streaming was advisable or healthy. According to Women’s Health, the treatment has potential negative side effects. This includes disruption of the natural flora, as well as burns if not administered correctly.

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Some of Goop's claims were found to be unsubstantial when several OB/GYNs dismissed it's 'Jade Egg' idea calling it a fat load of garbage.

There’s more to it.

Earlier this year, Paltrow shared the benefits of yet another non-scientifically proven process. This one involves putting a jade egg – about the size of a golf ball – and carrying it in your vagina all day or while you’re sleeping to channel out negative energy.

All claims were found to be unsubstantial when several OB/GYNs dismissed the idea calling it a fat load of garbage. For one reason, Jade is porous. Leaving it inside would allow bacteria to thrive leading to Toxic Shock Syndrome, a life-threatening complication.

For an entrepreneur, when you’re launching a new product into the market, it’s your moral responsibility to show studies or evidence. Launching a lifestyle brand doesn’t end at giving suggestions to readers about where to shop and eat. When you can have die-hard fans who trust you, the responsibility you have on your hands shouldn’t be taken lightly.

Let’s not forget that Gwyneth Paltrow is one of the judges on Planet of the Apps, a reality-competition serous on the Apple Music. It’s a blend of Shark Tank and The Voice, where developers with promising apps can refine their product with guidance from their celebrity mentor. This is real, and one wrong suggestion can end people’s careers.

Oh, Paltrow.

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